NOW I AM A SOLDIER

From Edinburgh's Royal High School to Sandhurst, the North West Frontier and the debacle of Dunkirk, this book details Douglas Tulloch's early years in the army. 

 

REVIEWS FOR NOW I AM A SOLDIER:

 

Meticulous Detail

Meticulous detail
This a story about Douglas Tulloch, a Scottish lad from Edinburgh who has his sights set on joining the Army, despite his father’s wishes that he should join the family’s legal practice. But the thought of working in the stifling confines of an office and struggling with all the legal terminology involved leaves him wanting to escape. After completing his training at Sandhurst, he opts to join the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and instead finds himself accepting his third choice of being commissioned in the Lothian Rifles and a posting to Peshawar, a major garrison town on the North West Frontier in India. The author sets out in meticulous detail how Douglas learns to handle the realities of war at close hand and how to lead and gain the respect and devotion of the men under his command, resulting in his steady rise in rank. His actions draw the attention of his commanding officers and in particular a mysterious intelligence officer who gets him involved in seeking out the identity of an Italian spy who Douglas helps to unmask. At this point I will draw a veil over his subsequent adventures as he returns home to take part in the final stages of the British Expeditionary Force fighting in France, ending up near Dunkirk, with all the horrors of betrayal and sacrifice involved.
I was immensely impressed at the author’s knowledge of the historical background uncovered, suffice it to say I started reading his latest novel early in the morning and was immediately immersed until I turned the final page at 11.30 that night, still lost in the detailed intricacies of the story. I can only say it was well worth reading and fully deserves the five stars given.

Michael N. Wilton

 

A super action-packed read

Malcolm Archibald, better known for his tales of 19th century warfare, moves forward in time in this excellent novel set in the late, 1930s and early 40s. Douglas Tulloch leaves school, his ambition to join the army, much to his father's chagrin, who expected him to follow in his footsteps in the legal profession. Douglas gets his way and is accepted at the Sandhurst Miltary Academy.
After completing his training he finds himself posted to his 3rd choice of Regiment, and is sent to serve on the North West Frontier in India. (Oddly enough, my own father served there in the 1930s).
He soon learns, the realities of modern warfare, and after distinguishing himself in action against the insurgents, eventually returns to England and finds himself, with the rest of the regiment, as part of the British Expeditionary Force in Northern France at the beginning of World War Two.
As the German army sweeps all before them he becomes part of the great withdrawal that ends with him and his men fighting their way through the enemy lines in an attempt to reach Dunkirk.
The action scenes in the book are realistically told, and the author certainly doesn't hold anything back when it comes to relating the horrors of war.
I thoroughly enjoyed the book which is part one of a trilogy and I will be eagerly awaiting the next instalment. Definitely a 5 star read. Totally enjoyable.

Sashadoo

 

Very good read. Well put together.

Started out slow and a little out of my norm. Put it down, picked it up later. Very glad I did. I look forward to continuing the saga. Very well done. Thank you for your book.

Erick

 

Promising start to a WWII series

Lt. Tulloch graduates from Sandhurst and is assigned to the Lothian Rifles in the Frontier of NW India. Upon his return to Scotland, a different kind of war commences in Europe, and the Rifles are deployed to France and Belgium. As we all know, it does not end well for the BEF.
As suggested by the title, Tulloch learns how to be a real soldier, an officer who can lead men and make difficult decisions. A recurring figure in the tale is an Italian spy, and this series of coincidental encounters was the only false note in the book. This looks to be an excellent series.

Charles F. Kartman

 

Wow I have not enjoyed a book this much in along time

A historical fiction for adults. He is able to keep the pace moving even in the start of the novel when I usually want to skip ahead to the action. I rate him up there with the greats Clavells and Cornwells. He didn’t even need to take it to some dark place that usually ends it for me. Great show.

Ronald J.

 

Kevin

Great story

Book was very interesting and a good read. Sorry that there is not a follow up book regarding the main character
Douglas Tulloch. Assume there will be in the future.

Kevin

Eric

Good war story.

A page turner . Liked the characters in the story. Lots of action. Easy reading . Could not put it down .

Eric

 

Trust the Author To Carry the Story Forward

Malcolm Archibald is a gifted writer in every genre. In writing about soldiers learning to be warriors he is brilliant. Douglas Tulloch is the main character of this story, a new Lieutenant in the "Lothin Rifles," a Scottish Division first engaged in war against Afghans, then against the German Army in Europe. The story gives us a main, and several interesting and vital supporting characters. It brings a new soldier from inexperience in fighting on the frontier to experience there and against the German Army. It tells of his thoughts, what he must do, how he must accomplish everything from getting acquainted with those under his command to down and dirty warfare. All this and more is presented in a way which leaves the reader almost gasping to read another few lines, another page, another chapter. This is Book 1 of what I hope will become more than two in a series. I will not spoil the story by telling you more than I already have. You will enjoy this book, it will first engage you, then demand of you to keep reading. Well done to Malcolm. A tour de force indeed. Buy it, read it. Well worth both the money and the time.

Berk Rourke

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